Category Archives: -Other EVs-

5 Reasons You Should Rock Down To Electric Avenue

plug in ev

Image source

There is no denying the EV revolution has begun to gain momentum, but there still aren’t enough people sat in the driving seats of these vehicles. Of course, it is only a matter of time before this changes, namely because they are becoming more alluring and sexy. At one point it was a market dominated by Nissan Leaf’s and the G-Wiz, but now we have the likes of Porsche set to enter the market and Tesla already doing their thing, which will inherently make going electric more appealing.

However, to wait would be criminal, so what can we do to urge more driver’s to go electric now? Well, the obvious answer – at least in our eyes – is to educate them. After all, the benefits are already available, it is just a matter of getting them into the frontal lobes of people in the market for a new car.

So, without further ado, here are the biggest positives to add to your EV argument:

Image source

  1. Fuel Savings

We don’t want to overload you with math because these arguments rarely hold sway over the Average Joe, so we’ll keep it sweet. The average electric car uses $3.74 worth of electricity to complete 100 miles. A conventional car costs $13.36. That is a saving of $9.62 every 100 miles, or a saving of $1,154 every 12,000 miles (which is the annual average).

  1. Safety Matters

For anyone stepping into a car, the matter of safety is right the way up there. That is where electric cars snatch another point from the gas-using counterparts. Not only do EVs have less moving parts, meaning there is less likely to go wrong, and thus less chance of a collision ending with you hiring the experts at https://www.davidchristensenlaw.com/, they also don’t use gasoline; a highly flammable – and explosive – liquid. The other thing worth pointing out on this front is there is no fire required. Unlike in gasoline cars.They require a spark in order for them to run hot. Do the math.

  1. Purchase Price

Since these cars were first introduced to the market, their prices have tumbled dramatically. The Nissan Leaf has slashed over $6000 from its cost, Honda has reduced the price of its Fit EV by a third, and the Mitsubishi I-MiEV is now under $15,000 when you factor in the federal tax credits that are offered. That is hard for anyone to ignore.

  1. Tax Incentives

We mentioned the federal tax credit thing briefly, but it really demands its own section. In short, the federal government offers up to $7500 in tax credits when you purchase an EV, while some states and local governments offer other incentives too. If the former part of that statement interests you then you can read about it in depth at https://energy.gov. This drastically reduces the cost of a new car, whether you paying upfront or looking to pay it off in finance. We can’t say exactly how much of an incentive you will get in your area, but it is worth looking up when shopping around.

  1. Less Maintenance

If we point you back to number 2, you will notice we touched on the less moving parts thing. To expand on this in the briefest way possible, less moving parts means less maintenance. No engine, no spark plugs, no valves, transmission, catalytic converter, distributor or anything like that. You know what we’re saying.

Electric Vehicles: Playing With Fire?

Naturally, any new type of technology is going to spark concerns about safety. Electric cars have been evolving for a while now, and they’re also a new take on something that has already existed for a long time too. So concerns over their safety aren’t exactly rife, and most people are probably more concerned about the safety of autonomous cars. But there are still some concerns that people have with the safety of electric vehicles on the road, as well as in other situations. Read on to find out some of the issues people have with electric vehicles and whether they’re right to be concerned.

Credit

Electric Car Fires

One of the problems that have arisen in relation to electric cars is the risk of fire. A few fires involving electric vehicles have occurred, which have made some people question their safety. Some politicians have even used these instances to put down electric cars. However, these accidents are very rare, which is why they often appear in the news. Most of them are connected to the use of lithium-ion batteries, which are no longer used in mass-produced electric cars. In fact, the rate of fires involving gasoline cars is much higher. However, it’s important to remember that this could be because there are still fewer electric cars on the road.

Safety in Accidents

Safety on the road and how electric cars perform in accidents is also important. Like any other car, electric vehicles need to go through vigorous safety tests and receive a safety rating. In addition, EVs need to conform to specific standards just for electric vehicles. These include things such as chemical spillage from batteries and ensuring batteries are secure in a crash. One benefit electric cars can offer is that their lower center of gravity often means they’re less likely to roll over. Still, if you drive an electric vehicle, you still need to be prepared for accidents by following guidance like the advice at https://www.caraccidentlawyer-ny.com/brooklyn-car-accident-lawyer/. It’s always better to assume that you could get into a crash caused by you or someone else.

Credit

Electric Vehicles and Pedestrians

One safety concern specific to electric vehicles relates to their quiet operation. While this is a benefit in some ways, it can also pose a danger to pedestrians. When pedestrians cross the road, it’s helpful if they can both watch and listen for traffic. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is looking at ways this issue could be addressed. They have suggested it could be helpful to require EVs to emit sounds at low speeds – something that some vehicles already have. Drivers should be extra careful to watch out for pedestrians when driving an electric vehicle.

Maintenance for Electric Vehicles

To keep electric vehicles safe, it’s important to conduct regular maintenance. Different vehicles have different maintenance requirements, but all should have their electrical systems checked often. This helps to prevent accidents and other issues. Find out more at http://knowhow.napaonline.com/electric-car-maintenance-need-know/.

Electric vehicles have some of their own safety concerns, but they largely share the same issues as other vehicles. They can even be safer in some respects.

5 Things You Should Know About Alternative-Fuel Vehicles

If you’re making an effort to go green, it’s time to consider an alternative-fuel vehicle. This one, simple change will help you lower greenhouse gas emissions, save on fuel costs, and qualify for tax breaks. Before you take the plunge and buy a brand new Tesla, do some research to help you determine the best vehicle for your lifestyle. In June of 2017, CarMax teamed with CleanTechnica to find out more about the people who drive alternative-fuel vehicles. Their survey resulted in a whopping 2,300 responses, and we’ve sifted through the data to answer these 5 frequently asked questions.

  1. Who buys alternative-fuel vehicles?

You may think that all hybrid owners are millennial hipsters with ironic t-shirts and Bernie Sanders bumper stickers. However, the reality is quite different. The average hybrid-owner is a 30-year-old male from the east coast with a bachelor’s degree. The truth may be surprising, but you can’t argue with the numbers:

  • 88% of alternative-fuel vehicle owners are more than 30-years-old.
  • 70% of the responses came from people with bachelor’s degree or higher
  • 26% of the responses came from the pacific coast

  1. Why do people buy hybrid and electric vehicles?

For many people, alternative-fuel vehicles have less to do with environmental concerns and more to do with practical considerations. More than half of the survey’s respondents report spending less than $100 per year on vehicle maintenance. In addition, more than 60% of the respondents expect to own their vehicle for more than 4 years. Last, but not least, some cities offer tax credits and HOV lane perks to drivers with hybrid or electric vehicles. Here are the details:

  • 29% purchased their vehicle to save money
  • 38% purchased their vehicle to save the environment
  • 29% purchased their vehicle for another reason
  1. How far can a person drive without recharging?

Range anxiety is one big reason why people hesitate to purchase alternative-fuel vehicles. Fortunately, these fears are (mostly) unfounded. Less than a quarter of all survey respondents have driven their vehicle until running ran out of fuel. On the other hand, nearly half of survey’s respondents have never driven more than 100 miles on a single charge. Here’s the breakdown:

  • 42% have a second non-electric vehicle for long trips
  • 14% have driven until they ran out of fuel and charge
  • 48% have never driven more than 100 miles on a single charge

  1. How do people charge their vehicles?

Charging stations are another other major hesitation among alternative-fuel vehicle owners. However, the survey results contradict this basic assumption. More than three quarters of the respondents own a vehicle with some sort of plug-in functionality. See for yourself:

  • 85% own a plug-in or all-electric vehicle
  • 84% of these people charge their vehicles in their home
  • 56% say it’s convenient to use a public charging station

  1. What are the most popular alternative-fuel vehicles?

The alternative fuel craze is really taking off. Since 2001, CarMax has sold nearly 100,000 electric and hybrid cars in the U.S. According to their survey, more than 75% of the respondents have owned their vehicle for two years or less. In addition, nearly two thirds of these vehicles were purchased by first-time alternative-fuel vehicle owners. That said, the top five most popular alternative-fuel vehicles are as follows:

We left the most important statistic for last. The CarMax survey also asked respondents whether or not they would recommend a hybrid vehicle to a friend or family member. On a scale of one to five, the average response was 4.8. I guess it’s true what they say–once you go green, you never go back.

The 1,000 hp VOLAR-e All Wheel Drive Electric Supercar

Batman music is an appropriate theme for something I could imagine in Bruce Wayne’s, you know, bat-garage.

From MotorAuthority.com:

Spanish industrial design firm Applus Idiada has formally presented a new electric race car concept called the Volar-e.

The Volar-e is one of the most powerful electric cars ever built and was showcased for the first time at a special event at the Circuit de Catalunya just outside of Barcelona, Spain, earlier today.

Its makers claim the car delivers a combined output of 1,000 horsepower and 737 pound-feet of torque, from a total of four electric motors powered by a lithium-ion battery.

The battery, which is made up of 10 individual cells, has its own rating of 38 kilowatt-hours and is said to take between 15 and 20 minutes to charge using a special fast-charging system. To help maintain charge, a regenerative system also features, helping to top up the batteries during breaking.

The technology behind the Volar-e was developed by Applus Idiada in collaboration with another firm specializing in high-performance electrics, Croatia’s Rimac Automobili, which recently unveiled its own 1,088-horsepower electric car.

Applus Idiada says the Volar-e will accelerate to 62 mph from rest in just 3.4 seconds and reach a governed top speed of 186 mph. Perhaps not surprisingly, the company hasn’t mentioned any range, as driving electric cars in race conditions is a sure way to deplete the batteries in a matter of minutes.

What may come as a surprise, however, is that the project received 50 percent of its funding from the European Commission, which says the aim of the project is to address the concerns of consumers who may be reluctant to purchase an electric car, such as limited driving range and long charging times.

The range of this vehicle is really going to be a determinant of whether the VOLAR-e can concept technology can be transferred to commercial use. It doesn’t really matter how fast an electric vehicle can charge and accelerate if it can only do one loop around the track before losing power. The design is beautiful, however the color scheme is definitely meant for a track car. Compare this to other super electric concept cars like the Eliica, the Ultimate Aero GT, and Venturi Volage.

Cambodia Unveils the Angkor EV 2013

Cambodia has unveiled a pretty cool looking little EV with scissor doors.  But with a top speed of 60 Km/hour (37 mph), it’s no Lamborghini Murciélago. The Angkor EV probably has a little pep accelerating to that top speed, but obviously there is no 0-60 time yet. The manufacturer claims the two-door can travel 300 km or 186 miles between charges, which is really not bad for a cheap little e-car.   At a price point of $10,000, it might be a solid economic choice for those that only do urban driving. But I must say, the doors are kind of funny way to pimp this affordable, eco-ride.

Cambodia’s Heng Development Company has branded the EV the  Angkor, after the Angkor Wat Hindu temple, and powerful Civilization world wonder if you are into Sid Meier’s strategy games. Below is a peek into Cambodian English news special, where you can see the Angkor EV’s scissor doors in action, while driving, oddly. Does anybody remember “ghost riding the whip?”

Sources:
http://www.phnompenhpost.com/2013010860664/Business/cambodia-launches-electric-car.html

Update on the Lightning GT

The Lighting GT was Great Britain’s answer to the Tesla Roadster in early development, and now the Model S in 2013. However with the current exchange rate the GT is going to set wealthy patrons back about a quarter of a million dollars or 150,000 British pounds. The electric supercar is hand built in Coventry, with 90% of the parts sourced from Great Britain. Right now, they are building 20 vehicles to the specifications of future owners.

The Lighting GT uses a unique battery technology, Lithium Titanate, with two different storage capacity configurations, 36 or 44 kWh, giving the vehicle a range of 120 or 150 miles. The batteries can be fully charged using a fast-charger in about 2.5 hours. The twin 150 kW electric motors power the back wheels, capable of pushing the supercar from 0-60 MPH in 4.5 seconds.

The body of the GT is made of carbon fiber with a lightweight aluminum honeycomb chassis. Interior and exterior are built to the specifications of the owner.  Like anything in life, you can let your imagination run wild, if you have the funds.

Pre-orders are available now.

Lightning GT interview