Category Archives: Model S

Tesla Model S Smashes Modified Mustangs in the Street

1320video ran into the Tesla Racing Channel guy racing his Tesla P100D on the street.  With nothing more than a gutted interior (took off about 500 pounds), and some lightweight seats, this economy-electric car shocked everybody when it went undefeated against a Mustang Cobra, a Twin Turbo 5.0 L Mustang, a couple Nitrous Foxbody Mustangs, and finally a Nissan GT-R. It’s AWD, and insta-torque make for a KILLER street combo, especially when the roads aren’t too great.  You can see how the all wheel drive is a huge advantage in street racing because of all of the debris that accumulates like rocks, dirt, and rubber.

Ironically, the electric family sedan silently breezes past every obnoxiously modified muscle car.  Every race is worth watching, seeing egos get crushed by a stock motor EV with all the interior pulled out.

So if you can’t wait to recoup the premium price you payed to save at the pump, just take your Tesla down to your local street racing league like this guy and hustle some money out of gas gusslers.

 

Tesla Touchscreen Art


The 17” center touchscreen featured in new Tesla models integrates media, navigation, communications, cabin control and vehicle data into one intuitive interface. Many functions are mirrored on the instrument panel and are voice-activated to focus the driver’s attention on the road. But many Tesla owners are finding it makes an even better digital finger-painting canvas.

Tesla drivers and their kids are also using the central display unit to make portraits, send messages, and celebrate holidays. @tesla_sketchpad features some of this console art from imaginative Tesla owners. I’m not sure if Tesla originally intended the touchscreen to be a digital arts and crafts center, but it certainly demonstrates how Tesla is pushing boundaries of what an automobile is capable of.

An artist at work with his canvas.

👌 #teslasketchpad #tesla #teslaroadtrip #teslaeasteregg #teslamotors #elonmusk #teslamodels #teslamodelx #teslamodel3 👍

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Spongebob and Patrick.

#teslasketchpad #tesla #teslaroadtrip #teslaeasteregg #teslamotors #elonmusk #teslamodels #teslamodelx #teslamodel3

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A nice message for dad.

Holiday cheer.

A fun new twist to your center console.

People Are Modding Their Teslas and It’s Awesome

When the Tesla Model S was new, it seemed like nobody would dare tarnish such an prestigious and technologically advanced automobile.  Like you wouldn’t put a spoiler on a Ferrari or a body kit on a Lamborghini, right?  But nowadays, it’s possible to find a used Tesla Model S for under $30,000, so younger and younger people are starting to get their hands on it. More and more owners are tinkering with rims, tinted windows, body kits, and body wraps. Some rental companies are using modded out Teslas to promote their business as well. Particularly in the middle east, well endowed people in the oil rich nations are getting really creative with their Teslas. Below are some of the more notable, wild, and/or insane Tesla modifications I’ve seen on Instagram.

A matte black Tesla Model S with red accents.

That I don’t know what you call it metallic pearl color changing purple blue chameleon paint job with rims on a Tesla.

A Tesla Model S with a body kit and sport rims with red brake calipers.

A matte black, murdered out, rest in peace Big Black Boykin, Tesla Model X.

Follow the rainbow paint job, Tesla Model X.

Rainbow 6 Winter camo wrap, Tesla Model S.

Wannabe internal combustion engine exhaust pipes, Model S.

Ketogenic diet body wrap, Model X?

Pretty mean body kit, Tesla Model S.

Super conceptual design, Model S.

You’ve gotta be kidding me, an all electric hearse, Tesla Model S.

A Porsche Tries to Keep Up With a Tesla

In a trending video, a Porsche Cayman tries to follow a Tesla Model S in ludicrous mode, which can accelerate from 0 to 100 km/h in 2.7 seconds. The electronic stability control of the Tesla Model S is demonstrated here. The electric motor and differential immediately respond to variations in conditions much quicker than an internal combustion engine can.

Model S Traction Control is designed to ensure maximum contact between the road and the tires. Whether you are accelerating off the line, zooming along the winding roads of the Rockies or find yourself in a Gulf Coast rainstorm, Traction Control prevents loss of traction and maintains control. Stability Control reacts in moments of under-steer or over-steer by reducing torque and applying the brakes to individual wheels for enhanced control when cornering. -Tesla Motors

See for yourself if the Porsche can keep up!

How Does an Electric Car Work? | Tesla Model S

Learn Engineering recently made a very informative video about how an electric car works. It is pretty in depth, but you don’t need a physics or engineering degree to understand it. Electric vehicles are simple.  They really only depend on a few major components less moving parts than and ICE engine. The video above details the main parts of a typical all-electric drive train.

1. The Telsa Model S has an induction motor with a stator and a rotor. The stator is the stationary part of an electric generator or electric motor. The non-stationary part on an electric motor is the rotor. The stator conducts and alternating current which creates a rotating magnetic field. This induces the rotor to rotate along with it. The frequency of the AC power supply directly correlates to the speed of the rotor, and thus the car. The motor speed can range from 0 to 18,000 rpm and the motor works efficiently at any speed range. An internal combustion vehicle produces usable torque and power at a limited speed range, which is why an IC engine needs a transmission. A piston powered engine also must convert linear motion to rotational motion therefore it also needs many components to convert and balance forces.

2. The inverter acts as the brain of the car because it is in charge of converting the direct current (DC) output from the batteries to AC output for the induction motor. The inverter controls the alternating current frequency, which, as you remember, controls the speed of the motor.

3. The battery of a Tesla Model S is a huge collection of tiny lithium ion batteries situated in “packs” lining the underside of the car. This aids in the vehicles low center of gravity. Tesla chose to basically just fill the packs with tiny cells rather than a few giant batteries because smaller cells can be more efficiently cooled. Heat is a major limiting factor in battery function.

4. The Tesla Model S uses a single speed transmission. Because of the nature of an electric motor, electric vehicles don’t require multiple gears to maintain torque. Also electric vehicles reverse by simply reversing the power phase of the AC current to the motor.

5. Like in most electric cars today, the Tesla Model S has regenerative braking. As soon as you lift the gas, the car will slow down as if by engine compression in an internal combustion car. But the key difference here is that energy is not lost to heat and friction, but recaptured in an electric car. The induction motor becomes a generator when the Tesla slows down. It accomplishes this when the rotor speed becomes faster than the rotating magnetic field. The generated electricity goes to the inverted and then the battery pack.

There you have it.  The Tesla Model S follows the same basic setup as most electric vehicles, with its own unique, proprietary twists that have made it the most popular electric car out there today.  With a few basic components, less moving parts, and less friction, electric vehicles are more simple and reliable than traditional internal combustion autos.  They are also better suited for future automation capability and, of course, better for the environment, especially as cities move to low carbon electricity generation.  Some day the internal combustion vehicle may become like the mechanical watch in an Apple Watch era.

Norway Is Rich with Oil, but They All Drive Teslas

On Vox Borders this week, I couldn’t help but think of a quote from Scarface,”Don’t get high on your own supply.”


Journalist Johnny Harris described Norway as “full of Teslas”.  While he doesn’t know much about the popular electric plug in, “0-60 in like… 5 seconds”, he does bring up an interesting observation about environmental and economic policies working together to affect change. In 2014, Tesla broke a record for number of cars sold in a month for a single model, of any kind of car, not just electric cars. In America, we’ve all seen the occasional electric vehicle, but in Norway, other Scandinavian countries,  and Iceland, electric vehicles are becoming omnipresent on all city streets. This is partly due to forward thinking politicians, and their fortunate access to renewable resources to generate electricity, like geothermal generation.  This renewable electricity makes electric vehicles much more beneficial over internal combustion cars, so it makes more sense to go all-in on a plug-in transportation future.

In 2016 in the United States of all the new cars that were purchased about 1% were electric, more like 0.9%. In Norway it was 29% and that trend is only speeding up: in January this year[2017] the share was like 37% or something of all the cars purchased being electric.

Many countries are adopting policies that make it cheaper for someone to buy a Tesla or any other electric car than to buy one in the United States.  In Norway, you get free parking if you drive an electric car, you get access to the HOV Lane, which has way less traffic, you don’t have to pay registration fees, you get tax deductions on your income tax, and perhaps the biggest incentive of all is on the business side: companies like Tesla don’t have to pay sales tax for selling in Norway.

Furthermore, you don’t have to pay for gas to drive an electric car in Norway, and you don’t even have to pay for electricity because that is on the house.  It’s all payed for by the sovereign wealth fund, which is comprised almost entirely of oil and gas money. Norway’s a huge producer of fossil fuels and they sell that to other countries.

While some might disparage Norway for funding their sustainable, clean future with dirty money, when you look at the situation objectively, they are still reducing their carbon footprint and fueling their own economic good compared to a business as usual approach. Using profits from older fossil fuel resources to improve the environment and wellbeing of their citizens is possibly the most beneficial way to spend tax dollars in the long and short term.

An most Norwegians are simply unapologetic for this caveat of their economy.  And why should they be?  If somebody else will pay their oil and natural gas, the Norwegian economy is much obliged to take their dollars, bitcoins, or yen and invest it in their transportation projects.  If it worked for Tony Montana, it works for Norway (I don’t remember the full plot to Scarface).