Category Archives: Tesla Model X

Here’s Why the Tesla Model X Is an Awful Car

Doug DeMuro has some interesting opinions on the Tesla Model X.  A few things he demonstrates about his rented Model X: how the “pigeon” wing doors operate under low ceilings, Tesla autopilot, utilizing interior space, and the electric SUV’s 257 mile range.

Norway Is Rich with Oil, but They All Drive Teslas

On Vox Borders this week, I couldn’t help but think of a quote from Scarface,”Don’t get high on your own supply.”


Journalist Johnny Harris described Norway as “full of Teslas”.  While he doesn’t know much about the popular electric plug in, “0-60 in like… 5 seconds”, he does bring up an interesting observation about environmental and economic policies working together to affect change. In 2014, Tesla broke a record for number of cars sold in a month for a single model, of any kind of car, not just electric cars. In America, we’ve all seen the occasional electric vehicle, but in Norway, other Scandinavian countries,  and Iceland, electric vehicles are becoming omnipresent on all city streets. This is partly due to forward thinking politicians, and their fortunate access to renewable resources to generate electricity, like geothermal generation.  This renewable electricity makes electric vehicles much more beneficial over internal combustion cars, so it makes more sense to go all-in on a plug-in transportation future.

In 2016 in the United States of all the new cars that were purchased about 1% were electric, more like 0.9%. In Norway it was 29% and that trend is only speeding up: in January this year[2017] the share was like 37% or something of all the cars purchased being electric.

Many countries are adopting policies that make it cheaper for someone to buy a Tesla or any other electric car than to buy one in the United States.  In Norway, you get free parking if you drive an electric car, you get access to the HOV Lane, which has way less traffic, you don’t have to pay registration fees, you get tax deductions on your income tax, and perhaps the biggest incentive of all is on the business side: companies like Tesla don’t have to pay sales tax for selling in Norway.

Furthermore, you don’t have to pay for gas to drive an electric car in Norway, and you don’t even have to pay for electricity because that is on the house.  It’s all payed for by the sovereign wealth fund, which is comprised almost entirely of oil and gas money. Norway’s a huge producer of fossil fuels and they sell that to other countries.

While some might disparage Norway for funding their sustainable, clean future with dirty money, when you look at the situation objectively, they are still reducing their carbon footprint and fueling their own economic good compared to a business as usual approach. Using profits from older fossil fuel resources to improve the environment and wellbeing of their citizens is possibly the most beneficial way to spend tax dollars in the long and short term.

An most Norwegians are simply unapologetic for this caveat of their economy.  And why should they be?  If somebody else will pay their oil and natural gas, the Norwegian economy is much obliged to take their dollars, bitcoins, or yen and invest it in their transportation projects.  If it worked for Tony Montana, it works for Norway (I don’t remember the full plot to Scarface).

Tesla’s Autopilot Predicts Crashes Freakishly Early [VIDEO]

All Tesla vehicles, including the future Model 3, have the hardware needed for full self-driving capability at a safety level substantially greater than that of a human driver.  As you can see in the video, all these drivers have to do is angrily lay on the horn after the fact.  This is an awesome demonstration of where transportation technology is headed, and how countless lives can be saved.

Teslas have eight surround cameras provide 360 degrees of visibility around the car at up to 250 meters of range. Twelve updated ultrasonic sensors complement this vision, allowing for detection of both hard and soft objects at nearly twice the distance of the prior system. A forward-facing radar with enhanced processing provides additional data about the world on a redundant wavelength that is able to see through heavy rain, fog, dust and even the car ahead.  The car calculates changing velocities of surrounding vehicles to predict whether you are in danger of an accident beyond your possible comprehension.  I can’t wait to see more videos showing how innovative technology is changing what we think is possible on the road.

Tesla Adds “Cabin Overheat Protection” in Software Update

Tesla has added another innovative smart feature to it’s on board software.  The new function is called Cabin Overheat Protection” and will protect children, dogs, cats, and other macroscopic organisms you happen to serendipitously leave in your Tesla while you are on your daily frappachino run.

Other updates in the newest software include a new user interface and improved autopilot.  What will they think of next at Tesla?

Upcoming electric cars that will conquer the market this year

In the past 5 years we’ve seen an increase in electric car manufacturing. Many international developers strongly believe that the future of the auto industry will depend on eco-friendly vehicles. Going green is no longer a luxury, and believe it or not, recent models of electric cars are no longer over-priced. In fact, some have pretty amazing built-ins and in-car technicals to surpass the efficiency and performance of conventional vehicles that run on gas. This year, the industry has spiked in eco-friendly cars; starting from the simplest all the way to the most groundbreaking. Here’s a quick guide with 5 “green” cars that will most like win you over.

ioniq

Hyundai IONIQ

Toyota Prius, it’s time for you to move over! IONIQ is here to take your spot. Even though it’s too early to tell whether or not Hyundai’s IONIQ model will be better than the Prius, rumor has it that it will be a fair competitor. The hybrid auto market is on the roll, and as new technologies emerge, it’s tough for manufacturers to stay on top. Hyundai has always been an ambitious car maker, and even though we can’t know for sure how advanced and powerful IONIQ will be, we can state that the plug-in hybrid will create some sort of hype. Rumor has it that the new model will deliver an incredible driving experience; apparently, some of the built-in features will provide a driving experience no other eco vehicle is currently offering.

Nissan Leaf

Nissan’s Leaf model is the most popular type of electric car in the world. Nearly 200,000 models have been sold since the release. The manufacturers are still making upgrades, and this year’s variant looks and feels better than ever. The latest Leaf comes with a 30 kWh battery, which is enough to drive for 155 miles. Why are casual driver so in love with this electric vehicle? First, because it is affordable – $18,000 on average – on average, and second because it looks nice both on the inside and on the outside. Nissan Leaf is comfortable, relaxing to drive and quiet. It is an electric pioneer that drivers are quite fond of!

Tesla Model X

There’s something about Tesla that keeps us interested. The company’s recent Model X is quite the beauty. It can easily get to 60 mph in roughly 3.2 seconds, not to mention that it looks pretty awesome too. Some say that Tesla’s Model X will be the best electric car of the year. It features enough room to fit up to 7 individuals, and it completely redefined in-car design. Sleek, modern and high-tech on the inside, Model X has certainly piqued our interest. The manufacturers argue that it is also the fastest electric car in the world, as well as the most capable utility vehicles created thus far. Safety is Model X’s biggest trump card. Considering it packs floor-mounted battery meant to lower its gravity center, the risk of rolling is extremely low.

tesla model x

Chevrolet Bolt

Chevy Bolt may not benefit from Tesla’s technology, but it’s still an electric vehicle with great potential. In fact, rumor has it that the most is the most anticipated of the year. The model will be hitting the market pretty soon, and many buyers are excited to test it out especially because it comes at an affordable cost – on average, $30,000. The fully electric hatchback offers seating for 5 people, thus making it ideal for small families. The engine can handle a mileage of 200, and the quick charging (30 minutes for 90 miles) will surely appeal to potential customers.

BMW i3

BMW’s i3 model is a remarkable electric hatchback. Featuring a rather unusual exterior built, we cannot help but wonder who thought of the design. The structure is made of carbon fiber, and as for the electric powertrain, the i3 packs legendary driving dynamics. Due to a low gravity center, the cars can easily go from 0 to 60mph in roughly 6.5 seconds. In terms of charging, this urban beauty doesn’t take longer than 3 hours to reach its full potential.

bmwi3

Numerous other electric cars are preparing to enter the market. Some see promising, whereas others are just pure science fiction. We still hope for Porsche’s Mission E to emerge so that Tesla can have some real competition.

By Christopher Austin and Design911.co.uk!

 

On the Tesla Model X

It seems like Tesla comes out with a new all-electric model every week these days, with the first Model S vehicles hitting the streets last year, and now the introduction of  their new Model X SUV.

The Tesla Model X is built on the Tesla Model S platform, which means the basic drivetrain is the same, with the battery, controller, and motor sitting in the same position.   The basic Model X is rear wheel drive like the S, however, you now have the option to upgrade to front and rear wheel drive. Pictured below is the drivetrain for the optional all-wheel drive model.

The second front mounted motor enables all-weather, all-road capabilities, increases torque by 50%, and horsepower bumps from 362 to 410.  When outfitted with AWD, the Model X Performance accelerates from 0 to 60 mph in less than 5 seconds, outperforming the fastest SUVs and many sports cars.  The low profile drivetrain also allows for a “frunk,” or a trunk in the front, as well as plenty of passenger and cargo space.

The interior focuses your attention on a giant touchscreen unit in the center console.  Critics say it is less responsive than your cutting edge tablet computer, but definitely navigable.  It does make you wonder, when is big a little too big.  Looks somewhat obnoxious to me.

Tesla claimed last year they would make the base model available for around $30,000 within 5 years, competitive with current not-even-luxury SUVs. This seems hardly believable right now.  If you want to be an early adopter, you’ll pay maybe twice that. You can make your reservation on their website for a mere $5k, which shoots up to $40k for the rare Signature Model.  The concept however, truly is revolutionary.  An SUV with the acceleration of a supercar, the cargo space of a minivan, and hopefully at the price of a BMW X3 or X5 will surely find a market with dual income families with who want to one up the neighbors.