Category Archives: Tesla Model X

The Complexes Of Putting Your Trust In A.I.

It’s widely agreed that the future belongs to electricity. There is going to be a time when fossil fuels either run out, or become too ineffective for companies around the world who want to make a profit. However, no one is arguing that electric cars will be the future, it’s the technology that will be inside them that is the current talk of the town. Autonomous cars sound like a brilliant idea because they’re supposed to take out the human error or chance of one and make the roads safer. But there have been mishaps and even bad accidents when these types of cars are being tested. Indeed this technology is in its infancy, but these cars are still being developed. Other cars with a combustion engine, are in fact using radar systems to stop, start and drive the car for the driver. But putting your trust in the A.I. to drive for you leaves open some questions.

Image by TTTNIS

Cruise radar

Cars like the BMW i3 are one of the main leaders in adaptive radar cruising. Put simply the car will essentially drive itself while on the motorway. Using complex computer systems that communicate with each other hundreds of times a second, the car will evaluate how fast and how far from the car in front, you should be going. However, it’s advisable for drivers to not use this system when the weather is not very good. Fog is the number one factor that can decide to block the sensors making it difficult for the A.I. to judge the distance of the car in front. However, even so, the ability to cruise at a calm and orderly pace, ever consistent, is seen far more efficient than any human being could achieve.

Credit John Voo

Known accidents

As recently as 2016 and 2017 Tesla Model X cars have been having major accidents while in their ‘autopilot’ mode. For some reason, the technology used in them doesn’t seem to recognise abnormal shapes even in clear weather. A truck was driven into by a Model X, and the only thing that saved the driver was the sturdiness of the design. This is just one of the tales that adaptive cruise control users can tell you. One would think now, the car accident lawyer contacting has gone up because of this. This is relevant to people who have been driven into by an electric car. You’re entitled to file a lawsuit with a big chance of winning if you have been injured, need money to fix or even replace your car, lost wages due to staying home to recuperate and payment for medical bills. Suddenly this futuristic technology looks like it’s more hassle than it’s worth, in its current stage of development.

Trusting A.I. is something that we’d all like to do, not just because it’s cool and it excites us to see machines being accurate and working well but also because human error is taken out of the equation. However, those who want to buy an electric car may find that they should stick to driving it themselves and not rely on cruise control software just yet.

Keeping Your Electric Car As Safe As Possible

Picture Source

Owning an electric car is very different to owning a standard diesel vehicle. Obviously, you know this and that’s why you bought the car. You know that the impact it has on the environment is far lesser, for example. The differences between electric cars and traditional cars are many. Nonetheless, when it comes to the ways in which you should be looking after your electric-powered vehicle, there are some similarities and some differences when compared to a standard car. Here’s how to keep your electric car as safe as possible.

Maintenance.

As with any car, maintenance is the key to keeping your car safe and roadworthy. And, as with any car, you need to become acquainted with the machinery at work within your vehicle so as to take care of it yourself. Even though regular check-ups are important, going to a repair shop every time there’s a problem is costly and time-consuming. Not to mention, it’s much safer and responsible to maintain your vehicle by yourself.

You need to understand the sophisticated electronics that run your car. Learn about the battery control module and how it discharges and charges the battery bank. You also need to learn about the heating and cooling systems because it’s important that these are well-maintained in order to keep your vehicle safe. Take a look at the hoses, clamps, and pipes to check the cooling system is working as it should be. As a piece of advice to make sure your battery doesn’t run into any problems, you should avoid a full charge; pushing your battery to its maximum capacity and then draining it is damaging.

Responsible driving.

If you want to keep your electric car as safe as possible then you need to be a responsible driver and that all depends on road awareness. You already have a license, so you’re qualified to drive a vehicle, but you might not necessarily be the most observant driver possible. Passing your driving test is one thing but you need to maintain that focus and concentration every time you get behind the wheel of a car. You might want to look into a mirror reversing camera kit because it’s so important to have complete vision of the road as a driver. And, sometimes, your rear view mirrors won’t suffice; blind spots are bad enough but other vehicles and things in the road can obscure your vision too. It’s a good idea to have as many backup options in place as possible and a camera can certainly help.

Continuing on from the point above, you need to be aware of the road in order to be a responsible driver but you also need to react to the road appropriately. Defensive driving is the best way to avoid accidents on the road. If you see a reckless driver then reacting aggressively to the situation and losing concentration could make you a danger to the road too. Additionally, driving defensively and cautiously means that you shouldn’t speed or brake hard; put your electric car under too much strain and it’ll wear out more quickly. You need to look after your vehicle in the way you would with any car.

Tesla Touchscreen Art


The 17” center touchscreen featured in new Tesla models integrates media, navigation, communications, cabin control and vehicle data into one intuitive interface. Many functions are mirrored on the instrument panel and are voice-activated to focus the driver’s attention on the road. But many Tesla owners are finding it makes an even better digital finger-painting canvas.

Tesla drivers and their kids are also using the central display unit to make portraits, send messages, and celebrate holidays. @tesla_sketchpad features some of this console art from imaginative Tesla owners. I’m not sure if Tesla originally intended the touchscreen to be a digital arts and crafts center, but it certainly demonstrates how Tesla is pushing boundaries of what an automobile is capable of.

An artist at work with his canvas.

Spongebob and Patrick.

A nice message for dad.

Holiday cheer.

A fun new twist to your center console.

People Are Modding Their Teslas and It’s Awesome

When the Tesla Model S was new, it seemed like nobody would dare tarnish such an prestigious and technologically advanced automobile.  Like you wouldn’t put a spoiler on a Ferrari or a body kit on a Lamborghini, right?  But nowadays, it’s possible to find a used Tesla Model S for under $30,000, so younger and younger people are starting to get their hands on it. More and more owners are tinkering with rims, tinted windows, body kits, and body wraps. Some rental companies are using modded out Teslas to promote their business as well. Particularly in the middle east, well endowed people in the oil rich nations are getting really creative with their Teslas. Below are some of the more notable, wild, and/or insane Tesla modifications I’ve seen on Instagram.

A matte black Tesla Model S with red accents.

That I don’t know what you call it metallic pearl color changing purple blue chameleon paint job with rims on a Tesla.

A Tesla Model S with a body kit and sport rims with red brake calipers.

A matte black, murdered out, rest in peace Big Black Boykin, Tesla Model X.

Follow the rainbow paint job, Tesla Model X.

Rainbow 6 Winter camo wrap, Tesla Model S.

Wannabe internal combustion engine exhaust pipes, Model S.

Ketogenic diet body wrap, Model X?

Pretty mean body kit, Tesla Model S.

Super conceptual design, Model S.

You’ve gotta be kidding me, an all electric hearse, Tesla Model S.

Here’s Why the Tesla Model X Is an Awful Car

Doug DeMuro has some interesting opinions on the Tesla Model X.  A few things he demonstrates about his rented Model X: how the “pigeon” wing doors operate under low ceilings, Tesla autopilot, utilizing interior space, and the electric SUV’s 257 mile range.

Norway Is Rich with Oil, but They All Drive Teslas

On Vox Borders this week, I couldn’t help but think of a quote from Scarface,”Don’t get high on your own supply.”


Journalist Johnny Harris described Norway as “full of Teslas”.  While he doesn’t know much about the popular electric plug in, “0-60 in like… 5 seconds”, he does bring up an interesting observation about environmental and economic policies working together to affect change. In 2014, Tesla broke a record for number of cars sold in a month for a single model, of any kind of car, not just electric cars. In America, we’ve all seen the occasional electric vehicle, but in Norway, other Scandinavian countries,  and Iceland, electric vehicles are becoming omnipresent on all city streets. This is partly due to forward thinking politicians, and their fortunate access to renewable resources to generate electricity, like geothermal generation.  This renewable electricity makes electric vehicles much more beneficial over internal combustion cars, so it makes more sense to go all-in on a plug-in transportation future.

In 2016 in the United States of all the new cars that were purchased about 1% were electric, more like 0.9%. In Norway it was 29% and that trend is only speeding up: in January this year[2017] the share was like 37% or something of all the cars purchased being electric.

Many countries are adopting policies that make it cheaper for someone to buy a Tesla or any other electric car than to buy one in the United States.  In Norway, you get free parking if you drive an electric car, you get access to the HOV Lane, which has way less traffic, you don’t have to pay registration fees, you get tax deductions on your income tax, and perhaps the biggest incentive of all is on the business side: companies like Tesla don’t have to pay sales tax for selling in Norway.

Furthermore, you don’t have to pay for gas to drive an electric car in Norway, and you don’t even have to pay for electricity because that is on the house.  It’s all payed for by the sovereign wealth fund, which is comprised almost entirely of oil and gas money. Norway’s a huge producer of fossil fuels and they sell that to other countries.

While some might disparage Norway for funding their sustainable, clean future with dirty money, when you look at the situation objectively, they are still reducing their carbon footprint and fueling their own economic good compared to a business as usual approach. Using profits from older fossil fuel resources to improve the environment and wellbeing of their citizens is possibly the most beneficial way to spend tax dollars in the long and short term.

An most Norwegians are simply unapologetic for this caveat of their economy.  And why should they be?  If somebody else will pay their oil and natural gas, the Norwegian economy is much obliged to take their dollars, bitcoins, or yen and invest it in their transportation projects.  If it worked for Tony Montana, it works for Norway (I don’t remember the full plot to Scarface).